December 15, 2008

MedZag gets beatdown by Old Man Winter.

oh hai. Apologies for going on hiatus for two weeks. Haven't had much to post for the last while, but we've currently been slammed with a nice winter storm the past two days which has effectively put me on house arrest. For those of you who have no idea where I go to med school... that pinpoints my location down to pretty much 30 of the 50 states. For those of you who know where I go to med school... you know what I'm talking about. We actually got a snow day yesterday, which I never thought I'd see in med school.

You know, in med school we like to talk about all the things we gain in our training. Experience, knowledge, insight, competency, warm fuzzies, giant egos, all that shmooze. But I also have been reflecting lately on the things I've lost in med school. No, not my virginity, or my sense of humor (completely). But I have lost a great deal of patience (thankfully no patients yet). Not to toot my own flute, but I used to be a pretty darn patient person in my younger life. But one of the constants in medicine is the feeling that there is never enough hours in a day. And I've been deluged with that feeling every day for a while now. Between trying to keep up on studying, trying to maintain my sanity, trying to make it to meetings and talks I find interesting, and trying to maintain a semblance of a six pack, I find it amazing I have found time to even poop or sleep. Lately I've noticed myself become exasperated by activities, PBL sessions, and lectures which I feel like are a waste of time. I haven't developed overt road rage yet, but have formed a habit of yelling expletives at slow drivers (which breed like rabbits in this state) in front of me regularly when driving alone.

But it all came to a head this week. Now normally I have quite the active routine. I go to the gym, go study at different coffee shops, basically get away from my apartment, which is too close to campus and frankly claustrophobic.

Damn you freezing temperatures. I've been stuck at home for only 2 days now, and have already resorted to cleaning my apartment (!), organizing my DVDs, and even studying at home, a near impossibility for me normally. I am going insane.

Speaking of studying, we're currently mucking through endocrinology, which I have come to disdain nearly as much as the kidney. I do not state that lightly. But unlike the kidney, I actually somewhat enjoy the pathophysiology of the subject, I have just come to disdain the manner in which it is conveyed to us. For example, some of the bullshit lectures we have been fed in the past 3 weeks:
12/02 - Nutrition in Diabetes
12/05 - Nutrition Assesment
12/08 - Weight Loss
12/05 - Nutrition and Disease
12/06 - Women Nutrition
12/06 - Pediatric Nutrition

There are three main thoughts I have come to from our course direction. (1) Endocrinologists are glorified nutritionists. (2) Why am I spending $180,000 for this degree when I could get a bachelor's degree in nutrition for $60,000 (and its online!!!) (3) Why the **** are 20% of our endocrine lectures on nutrition?

Look, I know eating healthy is all puppy dogs and ice cream for your body. And the health care burden would be reduced substantially if people learned to eat better. But last I checked, med school was supposed to teach me what I needed to know to practice medicine. And there's only one thing you need to know about nutrition as a practicing physician. And that may or not begin with a "c" and end with an "-onsult nutritionist."

For comparison, we have spent 8% of our time on thyroid disorders. Ah, med school.

3 comments:

Anna said...

I'm intrigued...

Canadian med student here, first year. We're in our endocrine block now and have had about 10 lecture hours on the thyroid and related disorders. Believe me, you do not need 10 lecture hours (+5 hours PBL + 2 hours 'self study) on thyroid disorders.

MammaDoc said...

Hey, nice blog. I was just accepted to medical school and I've been reading your blog to get a sense of what to expect in the coming years. It's nice to hear a nice middle ground opinion about medical school. You don't make it sound easy by any means, but at the same time, you also don't make it sound like the worst thing to ever happen to you. Keep it up!

www.mammadoc.blogspot.com

frylime said...

oooh, i love the "WE MUST ALL LOSE WEIGHT" lectures...especially when they are given by a physician who's BMI has be at least >30.